October 31, 2014

Congressman King says death of bin Laden may change thoughts on Pakistan, waterboarding

Iowa Congressman Steve King, a Republican, says there are a number of questions that need to be answered now that terrorist leader Osama bin Laden has been killed by U.S. forces in Pakistan. King says whoever emerges as the next leader of the terrorist group needs to be killed, too, and the U.S. needs to be “less forgiving than we’ve been” in terms of how Pakistan may have aided bin Laden.

The house where the 9-11 mastermind was staying was reportedly within 100 yards of a Pakistani military compound, and if that’s true, King says there had to be suspicions and secrets being kept.

King wonders if this episode may change President Obama’s mind about so-called torture techniques. King says the information on bin Laden’s where-abouts came from the U.S. compound at Guantanamo Bay and through the use of water boarding. He believes President Obama may change his mind on how to approach the War on Terror.

 King also wonders if the U.S. government needs to reconsider its diplomacy with Pakistan and the billions of dollars that nation is receiving as the result of the War on Terror.

“We need to take another look at Pakistan and we need to rethink that,” King says. “They have a nuclear arsenal and if they’re working sometimes as our enemy and sometimes as our friend, we’re going to have to rethink that relationship. We need to rethink how we operate inside of Pakistan. It looks like it worked pretty good this time.”

Nay-sayers claim President Obama fabricated the entire killing of bin Laden and that it’s convenient the body was dumped at sea. Others say it’s simply a way to get attention away from the economy and high gasoline prices. King says he firmly believes bin Laden is dead and King stands behind the president in this instance.

“He made a campaign promise to take out Osama bin Laden and he issued the order that directed them to use this tactical approach rather than bombing the compound,” King says. “He wanted to make sure we had a body and the president sat in and directed at least five different planning and intel meetings coming up to this.”

The attacks of September 11th, 2001, left 3,000 dead in New York, Washington, D.C. and Pennsylvania.

By Karla James